INDIVISIBLE WITH JOHN STUBBINS: Grassroots Movement Fights for Direct Democracy and Parental Rights - Citizen Media News ('config', 'UA-164490479-1');
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INDIVISIBLE WITH JOHN STUBBINS: Grassroots Movement Fights for Direct Democracy and Parental Rights

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In a recent interview on “Indivisible with John Stubbins,” Mike Netter, the co-chair of Rebuild California and radio host on KABC 790 AM, shed light on the grassroots movement’s fight for direct democracy and parental rights in the state. The conversation delved into the challenges faced during the effort to recall Governor Gavin Newsom and the broader mission of empowering citizens.

Netter emphasized the importance of direct democracy, highlighting California’s unique ability to enact change through citizen-driven initiatives. He recounted the successful recall petition against Newsom, debunking skeptics who claimed it required substantial funds. Netter stressed that the movement achieved its goal with less than $3 million, showcasing the power of determined citizens.

The interview also touched on critical issues affecting California, such as water management, forest fires, and school policies. Netter criticized Newsom’s decisions, pointing to the diversion of water to save a smelt and the mismanagement of forests contributing to wildfires. Common-sense solutions and a focus on issues that resonate with the public were highlighted as crucial elements of the movement.

The discussion shifted to parental rights, with Netter expressing concerns about the state’s influence on school curricula and decision-making. He revealed ongoing initiatives, including the CEO Act, to promote school choice and allow parents greater control over their children’s education.

Throughout the interview, Netter urged citizens to get involved, emphasizing the significance of overcoming apathy and engaging in the democratic process. He underscored the need for Californians to unite in addressing critical issues and preventing the export of what he termed “bad politics” to Washington.