REAWAKEN AMERICA: Ivan Raiklin - J6 Political Prisoner Update Conference Advocates for Civil Liberties and Justice - Citizen Media News ('config', 'UA-164490479-1');
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REAWAKEN AMERICA: Ivan Raiklin – J6 Political Prisoner Update Conference Advocates for Civil Liberties and Justice

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Las Vegas, NV – In a passionate gathering of advocates and family members of January 6th defendants, the “J6 Political Prisoner Update Conference” unfolded as a fervent plea for justice, transparency, and civil liberties. The event, which took place at an undisclosed location, featured a series of speakers who shared their perspectives on the ongoing situation surrounding the individuals arrested in connection with the events of January 6th.

The conference began with Dr. Simone Gold, who emphasized the importance of disseminating information that had not yet been disclosed regarding the J6 situation. Dr. Gold, known for her participation in Clay Park events, called for a deeper examination of the civil liberties at stake in these cases.

“We have people in prison unjustly. We have people in pretrial. Most importantly, we have people charged with crimes for which there is no evidence,” Dr. Gold declared, underscoring her concerns about the impact on individual freedoms.

One of the striking stories shared at the conference was that of an attendee who had spent 60 days in a maximum-security federal jail for a misdemeanor charge of entering and remaining on January 6th. This experience raised questions about the severity of punishments handed down for relatively minor offenses.

The speakers argued that the federal Department of Justice and the federal judiciary were acting in ways that were detrimental to justice. They highlighted issues such as the poisoned jury pool in Washington, D.C., and the practice of indicting individuals without all the elements of a crime being met.

The case of John Strand, a non-violent individual facing a 32-month sentence, was brought to the forefront, emphasizing the need for fair and proportionate sentencing. Ashli Babbitt’s mother, Micki Witthoeft, emotionally discussed the tragedy of her daughter’s death and the lack of accountability for it.

Throughout the conference, speakers conveyed the idea that the treatment of the January 6th defendants set a dangerous precedent for civil liberties. They argued that the situation had become a platform for political maneuvering, drawing parallels to former President Donald Trump’s involvement.

The event also shed light on the need for transparency in the form of video footage from January 6th, which could provide crucial evidence regarding the actions of both protesters and law enforcement officers. Attendees asserted that this footage belonged to the American people and called for its release.

The conference wasn’t just about sharing stories and grievances; it was a call to action. Attendees were encouraged to reach out to Congressman Barry Loudermilk, who chairs the Oversight Subcommittee of the House Administration Committee, and demand transparency and accountability regarding the events of January 6th.

Additionally, a nonprofit foundation called “Stand in the Gap” was introduced, aiming to provide support to January 6th defendants and fight for justice in the long term. The foundation’s representatives emphasized the importance of financial support in their efforts.

The conference concluded with an urgent appeal to righteous pastors and churches to support January 6th defendants and adopt their causes. Attendees were encouraged to get involved on a local level and take action within their communities.

As the J6 Political Prisoner Update Conference came to a close, it left a resounding message: the fight for justice, civil liberties, and accountability in the aftermath of January 6th is far from over. The passionate speakers and attendees expressed their commitment to advocating for a fair and transparent resolution to these cases, setting the stage for continued activism and engagement on the issue.

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